logo
 
 
Member login
Name :
Password :
forgot your password?
info at touch gamesinfo at touch foodsinfo at touch loansinfo at touch moviesinfo at touch travelsinfo at touch jobsinfo at touch cricketinfo at touch mobileinfo at touch newsinfo at touch sendfreesms
SELECT YOUR SERVICE
  Suppliers Directory
  Accounting & Financial Auditing
  Anti-Aging
  Apparel & Garments
  Arts & Crafts
  ATM Sales & Processing
  Auto Towing Services
  Automobile
  Ayurvedic & Herbal Products
  Baby Care
  Banking
  Bicycles & Rickshaws
  Building & Construction
  Business Banking & Finance
  Car Audio
  Car Video
  Cards & Greetings
  Clothing Accessories
  Computer
  Computer Accessories
  Computer Hardware
  Computer Software
  Credit & Lending
  Dyes & Chemicals
  Electronics & Electrical
  Face Care
  Fashion Accessories
  Flower Arrangements
  Food & Beverages
  Footwear
  Furniture Manufacturers
  Gems & Jewelry
  Gifts
  GPS
  Hair Care
  Hair Loss
  Hand & Machine Tools
  Health Care Services
  Holiday Decorations
  Home & Garden
  Home Audio & Video
  Home Supplies
  Home Textiles & Furnishings
  Household Supplies
  Hygiene & Toiletry
  Industrial Supplies
  Insurance
  Investing
  Jewelry
  Leather Products
  Make-Up & Cosmetics
  Mechanical Components
  Medical Products
  Metals & Minerals
  Musical Instruments
  Nail Care
  Natural Stones
  Nutrition & Dieting
  Office & School Supplies
  Oral Care
  Packaging Supplies
  Paper & Paper Products
  Party Supplies
  Perfumes & Fragrances
  Phone Equipment
  Photo & Video
  Plant & Machinery
  Plastic & Plastic Products
  Portable Media Devices
  Printing & Publishing
  Roadside Assistance Services
  Scholarships & Financial Aid
  Shaving & Grooming
  Skin Care
  Spa & Medical Spa
  Sports & Fitness Apparel
  Stationery
  Surveillance Equipment
  Traning & Sun Care
  Wedding Products & Supplies
  Wireless Devices
   
MAKE - UP AND COSMETICS

Cosmetics are substances used to enhance the appearance or odor of the human body. Cosmetics include skin-care creams, lotions, powders, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail and toe nail polish, eye and facial makeup, towelettes, permanent waves, colored contact lenses, hair colors, hair sprays and gels, deodorants, hand sanitizer, baby products, bath oils, bubble baths, bath salts, butters and many other types of products. A subset of cosmetics is called "make-up," which refers primarily to colored products intended to alter the user’s appearance. Many manufacturers distinguish between decorative cosmetics and care cosmetics. The word cosmetics derives from the Greek (kosmetikē tekhnē), meaning "art of dress and ornament", from κοσμητικός (kosmētikos), "skilled in ordering or arranging"[1] and that from (kosmos), meaning amongst others "order" and "ornament".

The manufacture of cosmetics is currently dominated by a small number of multinational corporations that originated in the early 20th century, but the distribution and sale of cosmetics is spread among a wide range of different businesses. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which regulates cosmetics in the United States[3] defines cosmetics as: "intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions." This broad definition includes, as well, any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product. The FDA specifically excludes soap from this category.

The first archaeological evidence of cosmetics usage was found in Egypt around 3500 BC during the Ancient Egypt times with some of royalty owning make-up, such as Nefertiti, Nefertari, mask of Tutankhamun, etc. The Ancient Greeks and Romans also used cosmetics.[5][6] The Romans and Ancient Egyptians used cosmetics containing poisonous mercury and often lead. The ancient kingdom of Israel was influenced by cosmetics as recorded in the Old Testament—2 Kings 9:30 where Jezebel painted her eyelids—approximately 840 BC. The Biblical book of Esther describes various beauty treatments as well.

In the Middle Ages, although its use was frowned upon by Church leaders, many women still wore cosmetics. A popular fad for women during the Middle Ages was to have a pale-skinned complexion, which was achieved through either applying pastes of lead, chalk, or flour, or by bloodletting. Women would also put white lead pigment that was known as "ceruse" on their faces to appear to have pale skin.[7]

Cosmetic use was frowned upon at many points in Western history. For example, in the 19th century, make-up was used primarily by prostitutes, and Queen Victoria publicly declared makeup improper, vulgar, and acceptable only for use by actors.[8] Adolf Hitler told women that face painting was for clowns and not for the women of the master race.[citation needed]

Women in the 19th century liked to be thought of as fragile ladies. They compared themselves to delicate flowers and emphasised their delicacy and femininity. They aimed always to look pale and interesting. Sometimes ladies discreetly used a little rouge on the cheeks, and used "belladonna" to dilate their eyes to make their eyes stand out more. Make-up was frowned upon in general especially during the 1870s when social etiquette became more rigid.

Actresses however were allowed to use make up and famous beauties such as Sarah Bernhardt and Lillie Langtry could be powdered. Most cosmetic products available were still either chemically dubious, or found in the kitchen amid food colorings, berries and beetroot.

By the middle of the 20th century, cosmetics were in widespread use by women in nearly all industrial societies around the world.

Cosmetics have been in use for thousands of years. The absence of regulation of the manufacture and use of cosmetics has led to negative side effects, deformities, blindness, and even death through the ages. Examples of this were the prevalent use of ceruse (white lead), to cover the face during the Renaissance, and blindness caused by the mascara Lash Lure during the early 20th century.

The worldwide annual expenditures for cosmetics today is estimated at $19 billion.[9] Of the major firms, the largest is L'Oréal, which was founded by Eugene Schueller in 1909 as the French Harmless Hair Colouring Company (now owned by Liliane Bettencourt 26% and Nestlé 28%; the remaining 46% is traded publicly). The market was developed in the USA during the 1910s by Elizabeth Arden, Helena Rubinstein, and Max Factor. These firms were joined by Revlon just before World War II and Estée Lauder just after.

Beauty products are now widely available from dedicated internet-only retailers,[10] who have more recently been joined online by established outlets, including the major department stores and traditional bricks and mortar beauty retailers.

Like most industries, cosmetic companies resist regulation by government agencies like the FDA, and have lobbied against this throughout the years. The FDA does not have to approve or review the cosmetics, or what goes in them before they are sold to the consumers. The FDA only regulates against the colors that can be used in the cosmetics and hair dyes. The cosmetic companies do not have to report any injuries from the products; they also only have voluntary recalls on products

 
 
 
 
 
 
             
 
             
 
             
 
 
 
  Hot Category Emergency Services
Social Media Links
Country We Serve Relevant Links
  youtube.com
twitter.com
flickr.com
digg.com
stumbleupon.com
metacafe.com
scribd.com
reddit.com
del.icio.us
segnalo.com
blogcatalog.com
technorati.com
mixx.com
mister-wong.de
slashdot.org

rojo.com
kaboodle.com
gather.com
folkd.com
India
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Brazil
Canada
China
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Hong Kong
Italy
South Africa
Srilanka
Egypt
Croatia
Venezuela
Viet Nam
  © Copyright 2015-16, Info at Touch All Right Reserved.