logo
 
 
Member login
Name :
Password :
forgot your password?
info at touch gamesinfo at touch foodsinfo at touch loansinfo at touch moviesinfo at touch travelsinfo at touch jobsinfo at touch cricketinfo at touch mobileinfo at touch newsinfo at touch sendfreesms
  Suppliers Directory
  Accounting & Financial Auditing
  Anti-Aging
  Apparel & Garments
  Arts & Crafts
  ATM Sales & Processing
  Auto Towing Services
  Automobile
  Ayurvedic & Herbal Products
  Baby Care
  Banking
  Bicycles & Rickshaws
  Building & Construction
  Business Banking & Finance
  Car Audio
  Car Video
  Cards & Greetings
  Clothing Accessories
  Computer
  Computer Accessories
  Computer Hardware
  Computer Software
  Credit & Lending
  Dyes & Chemicals
  Electronics & Electrical
  Face Care
  Fashion Accessories
  Flower Arrangements
  Food & Beverages
  Footwear
  Furniture Manufacturers
  Gems & Jewelry
  Gifts
  GPS
  Hair Care
  Hair Loss
  Hand & Machine Tools
  Health Care Services
  Holiday Decorations
  Home & Garden
  Home Audio & Video
  Home Supplies
  Home Textiles & Furnishings
  Household Supplies
  Hygiene & Toiletry
  Industrial Supplies
  Insurance
  Investing
  Jewelry
  Leather Products
  Make-Up & Cosmetics
  Mechanical Components
  Medical Products
  Metals & Minerals
  Musical Instruments
  Nail Care
  Natural Stones
  Nutrition & Dieting
  Office & School Supplies
  Oral Care
  Packaging Supplies
  Paper & Paper Products
  Party Supplies
  Perfumes & Fragrances
  Phone Equipment
  Photo & Video
  Plant & Machinery
  Plastic & Plastic Products
  Portable Media Devices
  Printing & Publishing
  Roadside Assistance Services
  Scholarships & Financial Aid
  Shaving & Grooming
  Skin Care
  Spa & Medical Spa
  Sports & Fitness Apparel
  Stationery
  Surveillance Equipment
  Traning & Sun Care
  Wedding Products & Supplies
  Wireless Devices
   
ELECTRIC AND ELECTRONICS

Electrical engineering is a field of engineering that generally deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics and electromagnetism. The field first became an identifiable occupation in the late nineteenth century after commercialization of the electric telegraph and electrical power supply. It now covers a range of subtopics including power, electronics, control systems, signal processing and telecommunications.

Electrical engineering may include electronic engineering. Where a distinction is made, usually outside of the United States, electrical engineering is considered to deal with the problems associated with large-scale electrical systems such as power transmission and motor control, whereas electronic engineering deals with the study of small-scale electronic systems including computers and integrated circuits.[1] Alternatively, electrical engineers are usually concerned with using electricity to transmit energy, while electronic engineers are concerned with using electricity to process information. More recently, the distinction has become blurred by the growth of power electronics.

Electricity has been a subject of scientific interest since at least the early 17th century. The first electrical engineer was probably William Gilbert who designed the versorium: a device that detected the presence of statically charged objects. He was also the first to draw a clear distinction between magnetism and static electricity and is credited with establishing the term electricity.[2] In 1775 Alessandro Volta's scientific experimentations devised the electrophorus, a device that produced a static electric charge, and by 1800 Volta developed the voltaic pile, a forerunner of the electric battery.[3]

However, it was not until the 19th century that research into the subject started to intensify. Notable developments in this century include the work of Georg Ohm, who in 1827 quantified the relationship between the electric current and potential difference in a conductor, Michael Faraday, the discoverer of electromagnetic induction in 1831, and James Clerk Maxwell, who in 1873 published a unified theory of electricity and magnetism in his treatise Electricity and Magnetism.[4]

Thomas Edison built the world's first large-scale electrical supply network.

During these years, the study of electricity was largely considered to be a subfield of physics. It was not until the late 19th century that universities started to offer degrees in electrical engineering. The Darmstadt University of Technology founded the first chair and the first faculty of electrical engineering worldwide in 1882. In the same year, under Professor Charles Cross, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology began offering the first option of Electrical Engineering within a physics department.[5] In 1883 Darmstadt University of Technology and Cornell University introduced the world's first courses of study in electrical engineering, and in 1885 the University College London founded the first chair of electrical engineering in the United Kingdom.[6] The University of Missouri subsequently established the first department of electrical engineering in the United States in 1886.

Nikola Tesla made long-distance electrical transmission networks possible.

During this period, the work concerning electrical engineering increased dramatically. In 1882, Edison switched on the world's first large-scale electrical supply network that provided 110 volts direct current to fifty-nine customers in lower Manhattan. In 1884 Sir Charles Parsons invented the steam turbine which today generates about 80 percent of the electric power in the world using a variety of heat sources. In 1887, Nikola Tesla filed a number of patents related to a competing form of power distribution known as alternating current. In the following years a bitter rivalry between Tesla and Edison, known as the "War of Currents", took place over the preferred method of distribution. AC eventually replaced DC for generation and power distribution, enormously extending the range and improving the safety and efficiency of power distribution.

The efforts of the two did much to further electrical engineering—Tesla's work on induction motors and polyphase systems influenced the field for years to come, while Edison's work on telegraphy and his development of the stock ticker proved lucrative for his company, which ultimately became General Electric. However, by the end of the 19th century, other key figures in the progress of electrical engineering were beginning to emerge

 

 


 
 
 
 
 
 
             
 
             
 
             
 
 
 
  Hot Category Emergency Services
Social Media Links
Country We Serve Relevant Links
  youtube.com
twitter.com
flickr.com
digg.com
stumbleupon.com
metacafe.com
scribd.com
reddit.com
del.icio.us
segnalo.com
blogcatalog.com
technorati.com
mixx.com
mister-wong.de
slashdot.org

rojo.com
kaboodle.com
gather.com
folkd.com
India
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Brazil
Canada
China
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Hong Kong
Italy
South Africa
Srilanka
Egypt
Croatia
Venezuela
Viet Nam
  © Copyright 2015-16, Info at Touch All Right Reserved.